This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862


Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862 file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862 book. Happy reading This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862 Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862 at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862 Pocket Guide.
How It All Went Down

In which there is fierce fighting on May 3, as the Confederates fight to reunite their divided forces at Chancellorsville. In which Stonewall Jackson is wounded by friendly fire on the evening of May 2, at the Battle of Chancellorsville. In which Stonewall Jackson's flank attack on the evening of May 2, stalls due to his command's increasing disorganization, the onset of night, and stiffening Federal resistance.

In which Stonewall Jackson completes his famous flank march and prepares to launch his attack, which took place on the evening of May 2, at the Battle of Chancellorsville. In which we get Stonewall Jackson started on his famous flank march, which took place during the Battle of Chancellorsville on May 2, In which Robert E. Lee moves to counter the threat from the Federal flanking force at Chancellorsville. In which we see that while the Federal flanking force converges on Chancellorsville, the left wing of Hooker's army crosses the Rappahannock River just below Fredericksburg on April 29, In which we see the Army of the Potomac begin to move and open the spring campaign, which will lead to the Battle of Chancellorsville during the first week of May In which we begin our coverage of the Battle of Chancellorsville, which took place in Virginia during the first week of May In which we finish up with our look at the Federal operations against Charleston, South Carolina during the summer of and spring of In which we look at the Federal operations against Charleston, South Carolina during the summer of and spring of In which we look at the story behind the cavalry fight near Kelly's Ford on the Rappahannock River on March 17, In which we look at how the Army of the Potomac came to look at Fighting Joe Hooker as the best thing since sliced bread.

In which we share a short postscript to our coverage of the Battle of Galveston Texas , which took place on January 1, In which we look at the action during the Battle of Galveston Texas , which took place on January 1, In which we set the stage for the Battle of Galveston Texas , which took place on January 1, In which we continue with our look back at what happened during the second year of the Civil War.

In which we use a couple of episodes to take a look back at what happened during the second year of the Civil War. In which we wrap-up our discussion of the Battle of Stones River, which took place outside Murfreesboro, Tennessee from December 31, to January 2, In which we continue telling the story of the Battle of Stones River, which took place outside of Murfreesboro, Tennessee from December 31, to January 2, In which we continue to tell the story of the Battle of Stones River, which took place outside of Murfreesboro, Tennessee from December 31, to January 2, In which we look at the start of the Confederate attack on the morning of December 31, at the Battle of Stones River.

In which we continue to set the stage for the Battle of Stones River, which took place outside Murfreesboro, Tennessee from December 31, to January 2, In which we start to set the stage for the Battle of Stones River, which took place outside of Murfreesboro, Tennessee from December 31, to January 2, In which we look at the political and military fallout after the Federal defeat at the Battle of Fredericksburg in December In which we wrap-up our discussion of the Battle of Fredericksburg, which took place on December 13, In which we look at the series of increasingly futile assaults the Federals launched against Marye's Heights at the Battle of Fredericksburg on December 13, In which we switch our focus to the action on the northern part of the battlefield on December 13, , as the Federals begin to launch a series of bloody, futile assaults against Marye's Heights.

Smith, George G. Thompson, P. Thompson, Beverley Tucker, and William Waller. The letters are mostly of a personal nature, discusssing college life, family news, farming, politics, and the Civil War. Berlin, Ira, editor. Records of southern plantations from emancipation to the great migration. Collection consists of papers and records of postbellum tobacco and cotton plantations in North Carolina and Virginia, dating and containing personal and family correspondence, store account books, rental account books, farm ledgers, legal records, cash books, and a diary.

Contains information on the credit system that developed following the war, postbellum store owners and the accounts of freedmen, the Freedmen's Bureau, the southern labor system including African American wage labor, sharecroppers, the African American experience following the Civil War, African American politicians, slavery, abolitionism and abolitionists, and Civil War, Reconstruction and New South politics.

Bernard, D. Order, 2 February Copy of Special Order No. Bernard, George S. Papers, , no date. Papers, and no date, of George S. Bernard of Petersburg, Virginia, consisting of letters, , from Pattie B. Cowles of Petersburg to Bernard while serving in the Petersburg Rifles later Company E, 12th Virginia Infantry stationed in Norfolk, Virginia, describing life in Petersburg in the early days of the Civil War; providing social and family news and gossip; declaring the devotion of the women of Petersburg to the cause and to the men who have left to fight; commenting on Alabama and South Carolina troops which have passed through Petersburg; and stating that President Jefferson Davis passed through Petersburg.

Papers also include an undated speech praising the men and women of the Confederacy and their continuing contributions. Betts, Luther. Papers of Luther Betts of the 9th Virginia Cavalry Regiment, including an order, 6 March , for cavalry detail, and parole, 2 May Beverley, Jane Eliza Carter. Includes information on Civil War action in the surrounding area, and her personal recollections of General Robert E. Lee These reminiscences were transcribed by Robert Beverley Herbert b.

Bevier, Isaac. Letter, 5 July Letter, 5 July , from Isaac Bevier b. He discusses the fighting and a flag that his regiment captured as well as news of camp life, including some souvenirs he and others have picked up. Letter, 15 September Letter, 15 September , from Isaac Bevier of Company E, 44th New York Infantry, to his parents detailing the second battle of Manassas Bull Run , his wounding, and his stay in the hospital including work as a nurse. He also comments on the campaigning leading up to the battle of Antietam.

Also includes a casualty list for the 44th New York. Beville, Ella. Notebook, Hardaway d. Bidgood, Joseph Virginius. Black concerning the War of military record of Obadiah Hawkins ca. Billingsly, Joseph. Letters, December Billingsly outlines his military duties, describes the condition of his winter quarters, and discusses the weather. Billingsly also tells of washing clothes on Christmas Day and asks about his family. Bills, George. Letter, 27 April Letter, 27 April , from George Bills d.

He states that the army is raising breastworks and that sharpshooters fire at anyone who shows his head. Bills writes that soldiers often talk about when they will be heading home and that he expects they will be paid soon. Bills also sends Calvin a power of attorney and some apple tree seeds. He asks Calvin to send a fine comb because of lice and ticks. There is also a transcript. Binford, William F. Autograph collection, Autograph collection, , of William F. Binford, Jr. Collection contains signatures of prominent Confederate and Union military figures from letters, military records, legal documents, receipts, as well as clipped signatures.

Also included is published biographical information for some of the individuals. Binns family. In part, photostats. Papers include birth and marriage information; a list of slaves owned by various family members; a letter from Charles H. Binns, Jr. Birdsong, James C. Reminiscences of Civil War service, no date.

Reminiscences of Civil War service by James C. Birdsong also mentions his being a prisoner of war. Blackford, Benjamin Lewis. Sketchbook, Accession c.

In part photographs and negatives. Sketchbook, , of Benjamin Lewis Blackford of Lynchburg, Virginia, containing sketches of Spotsylvania County, Virginia, the ruins of Chancellorsville, Virginia, soldiers, and other landscapes. Blackford, William Willis. Memoirs: First and Last, or Battles in Virginia. Memoirs of William Willis Blackford entitled "First and Last, or Battles in Virginia," are a typed transcript that detail, chronologically by campaign, the exploits of Blackford while serving as a cavalry officer with the 1st Virginia Cavalry Regiment under Jeb Stuart and as an officer with the Engineer Corps.

These memoirs are very anecdotal, and were published in as War Years With Jeb Stuart reprinted Blackington, R. Letter, 4 November Letter, 4 November , from R. Blackington of Company I, 20th Maine Infantry, in Culpeper County, Virginia, to his mother Louisa Blackington detailing how the regiment stripped homes for items to use in camp, providing other news, and asking for stockings that he can sell.

Blair, Luther R. Parole, 8 May Parole, 8 May , of Luther R. Fletcher, Danville, Virginia. Blair, William B. Accession x. Letter, 9 June , from William Barrett Blair b. Blaisdell, George. Letter, 26 October Blanchard, Henry T. Letter, 9 November , from Henry T. Blanchard writes about recent battles with the enemy, including those at Brandy Station and Rappahannock Station, as well as the taking of prisoners, the location of various troops, and the cold weather. Letter, 27 August Letter, 27 August , from Henry T.

Blanchard also adds a postscript to his brother. Bland County Va.

Logging out…

Bland County, Virginia, Pleas, Board of Military Exemption Minutes and Board of Supervisors Minute Book, bulk , document specific types of records as noted related to county court orders such as the appointments of various Constitutional officers of the county and exemption board rulings, , related to permanent bodily infirmity during the Civil War years when paper was scarce. Pages for these two sections are not numbered.

There are loose papers in this section between pages and Blanvelt, William L. Letter, 28 December Letter, 28 December , from William L. Blanvelt, Lewinsville, Fairfax County, Virginia, to his brother. Topics include a recent battle at Dranesville Fairfax County , weather, Christmas, and views on the war. The letter was written on letterhead illustrated with a portrait of General McClellan. Bledsoe family. Papers, , of the Bledsoe family of Fentress County, Tennessee; the Hinds family of Barren County, Kentucky; and the Conlee family of Washington County, Illinois; as well as from members of the families who settled in other parts of Tennessee and Kentucky and settled in California and Iowa.

Letters consist mainly of social and family news of the three families. Of particular interest are letters, , from William M. Bledsoe to his wife Sarah Hinds Bledsoe b. Hinds and James M. Bliss, Lyman B. Letter, 16 July Letter, 16 July , from Lyman B. Bliss b. Bliss comments that he was not at the fight because of his health, which he elaborates on.

He also mentions his brother Samuel ca. Board, Francis Howard. Letter, 11 February Dearing, and troop movements. Bock, Linda Wilkinson. In part Photocopies. Bock ; Bock and Wilkinson families; William L. Includes papers of William Fanning Wilkinson concerning the Civil War and his loyalty oath, and papers concerning the Sons of Confederate Veterans.

Boggs family. Includes a biographical sketch of Francis Makemie ca. Compiled by Myra Boggs with assistance from Dorothy Bonniwell. Boggs, F. Letter, 31 March Letter, 31 March , from F. Hays Otey , Captain of Otey's Artillery Company, Danville, Virginia, regarding the placement of artillery for the defenses of Danville without Boggs' orders, and that the guns are not to be positioned anywhere until there is a necessity.

Includes a note, 1 April , from Colonel R. Withers , commanding at Danville, stating that he had ordered the guns placed and they could not be moved. Boisseau, Mary Leigh. Abstracts of the proceedings of the Board of Exemption for Pittsylvania County, Virginia, in , compiled by Mary Leigh Boisseau of Danville, Virginia, in , consisting abstracts of the minutes of the Pittsylvania County Board of Exemptions concerning the evaluation of applications of soldiers for discharge from military duty. Abstracts list the name of the soldier, application disposition approved or rejected , and cause, if approved.

There are handwritten corrections made by the compiler. Bolton, James. Medical daybook, Daybook, 24 October January , of James Bolton consisting of a daily record of patients seen, both private and military, often including rank, age, or address. Other sections of the book include more detailed notes of surgery and other treatments, a record of stimulants administered, vaccination procedures and records, and some medicinal preparations. Bond, Herbert G. Bond and his sister-in-law Julia F.

Pierce Bond of Dummerston, Windham County, Vermont, describing camp life, drilling, rations, and picket duty. Bond describes the Virginia countryside, including a description of the Fairfax County court house. He mentions Generals Ambrose Burnside and E. Stoughton , as well the Confederate army. He also mentions the troops playing baseball. Booth, Cyrus Monroe. Letter, 12 January Letter, 12 January , from Cyrus Monroe Booth of Company E, 27th New York Regiment, to his sister Emma informing her that he is sending her a picture of him, and describing the return to the regiment of 35 men captured at the first battle of Manassas Bull Run.

He details the reception for them and sketches how banners and wreaths were hung to celebrate their return. Boothe family. Papers, , of the Booth family of Suffolk, Virginia, consisting of a flyleaf from an undesignated book, ; an invoice, 7 April , for a coffin bought by Nathaniel Boothe, for his wife, in Suffolk, Virginia; and a receipt, 1 May , for items impressed from Boothe by Captain T.

Bosher, Judson S. Collection, Papers, , collected by Mrs. Judson S. Westmore to William D. Clarissa H. Robins for a fee for entering land transferred; a receipt, 8 February [? Gordon to William D. Robins; an agreement, 19 March , Alexander R. Bell, John S. Byers, and Richard H. Dudley with David B. Bell with Harrison T. Bolen, ; a letter, 26 March , from E. Galt of Lynchburg to "Arthur", commenting on military affairs and discussing local and family news. Bosworth family. Papers, , of the Bosworth family of Randolph County, West Virginia, consisting of letters written to and from Squire Newton Bosworth while he was serving in the 31st Virginia Infantry during the Civil War.

There are also letters written to and from his father Dr. Squire Bosworth Subjects of the letters written by Squire Newton Bosworth include his opinions of deserters, news of fellow soldiers and residents of Randolph County, troop movements, and the activities of his father. Also included in this collection is a forage receipt, as well as poetry written by Squire Bosworth while being held in prison. Papers, , of the Bosworth family of Randolph County, West Virginia, consisting of receipts, , , for J.

Alerts In Effect

Barrett of Christian County, Illinois, attacking Bosworth for his Confederate sympathies, this being the letter mentioned by Joshua and Squire Bosworth. Bosworth, James. Botetourt County Va. Minutes of the Provisional Committee, Most petitions were made on the grounds of permanent bodily infirmity or having furnished a substitute. Most all statements about applications for exemption state the regiment to which the requestor was drafted to serve. Two of the meetings give names of free male negroes who were drafted into the Confederate States Quartermaster department to work on defenses in the New River District or with the Army of South Westerly Virginia.

The final pages of the volume contain information more likely to be found in a court minute or order book and dates from and Barger vs. Polly Barger etc. Botts, John Minor. Cist of Cincinnati, Ohio, containing correspondence stating that James Patton Preston is still alive and living in Montgomery County, Virginia, but that Thomas Mann Randolph is deceased.

There are four newspaper clippings on the inside of the letter concerning Botts during the Civil War, when he under suspicion for his Unionist sentiments. Also includes a portrait of Botts and a brief biographical sketch. Bouldin, William D. Papers, Accession Includes letters written by and to Bouldin while he was being held prisoner at Point Lookout, Maryland, during the Civil War.

Majority of the collection is correspondence between him, after he settled in Kentucky, and his sisters, who either remained in Virginia or also moved to Kentucky. Also contained in the collection is information on the 18th Virginia Infantry, including battles fought, numbers of troops involved, killed in action, and wounded, and a list of officers.

Boulware, James Richmond. There are also transcripts of two letters written by Boulware to his brother-in-law William Stokes who had married Eliza Boulware discussing Confederate military activities around Franklin, Virginia, in March , and around Knoxville, Tennessee, in December Bouton, George. Letters, , of George Bouton ca. Collection includes typescript copies. Letters, , from George Bouton ca. Bowden, Henry M.

Papers, , of Henry M. Bowden of James City County and Norfolk, Virginia, including accounts, appointments, correspondence, election results, oath of allegiance, and passes. Most of the letters written by Bowden relate to the hardships he endured by staying loyal to the United States government and his efforts to obtain employment and monetary reparations for lost property. Includes a letter, 31 April , from his daughter, Alice Bowden, regarding life in Williamsburg and attitudes of neighbors towards the family and a statement from Thomas Kemper, , about rental property in Norfolk; a letter, 3 March , from W.

Chase, Secretary of the Treasury, asking for a government appointment; and appointments and letters, , to and from Union general Benjamin F. Butler in which he obtained a post of financial clerk for the Provost Marshal. Also of note is a letter, 11 October , to General Howard from Bowden, asking for reparations for his home and property lost.

Bowden, L.


  • Johnson's Island Confederate Civil War Prison Cemetery!
  • Pacific Worlds;
  • Capital, Interest, and Rent.
  • The Vampires Second (Chosen Book 2).
  • This Day in the Civil War.
  • Civil War 1862.
  • Saras Shame (The Sara Colson Trilogy Book 3).

Telegram, 8[? United States military telegram, 8[? Telegraph states that Mrs. Piggot[t], her family, and her slaves have been escorted to Richmond, Virginia. Two or three slaves have escaped to Union lines. Captain Faith may have been Anderson Faith of the 5th Pennsylvania Cavalry, which was stationed in the area. Bowles, John R. Letter, 6 January Letter, 6 January , from John R. Bowles of Company F, 6th Virginia Cavalry, to his mother and sisters living in Baltimore, Maryland, stating that he had been given a furlough to acquire horses for the company and regiment, that he had been able to visit relatives in Botetourt County, Virginia, and sending news of them home.

Bowles comments on the battle of Gettysburg.

enter

The Civil War Timeline of Important Dates

He also asks how his family and friends in Baltimore are doing and describes some aspects of life as a soldier. Bowling, William H. Letters, , Inkjet and Xerox copies. Letters, and , from Private William H. Letter, 2 August , from Culpeper Court House, Virginia, discusses military rations, a possible furlough, and the progress of the war. Bowling also directs his wife, Lucretia, on what type of crop to plant. Letter, 19 March , from a camp near Petersburg, Virginia, comments again on a lack of rations for the men and a plan by the military to take food stores from civilians to provide for soldiers.

Bowling also discusses the lack of feed for his horse and the need for another mount. Bowling anticipates the upcoming battle of Petersburg and notes troop desertions are a problem. He also mentions news of General William T. Bowman, Henry. Letter, 20 November Burnside of the command of the Army of the Potomac and offering opinions on the leadership skills of McClelland and Burnside.

Bowman also relates stories of his own encounters with Burnside. Other topics include the recent election of John Albion Andrew as governor of Massachusetts, camp life, and health. Boyd, A. Letter, 10 October He also expresses his thoughts about possibly leaving Virginia. Boyer, John. Letter, 7 February Boyer, regarding family, health of friends and family in New Market, Virginia, and Union raids on the mail service. Boyes, Harrison H.

Letter, 22 July Letter, 22 July , from Harrison H. Boyes adds that the 2nd Iowa and 2nd Michigan are the best cavalry units in the western Union army. Boyes also asks for news and states that Union prospects are gloomy, mainly due to the defeat of George B. Boyle, Cornelius. Military pass, 30 August Also includes an envelope which contained the pass.

Bozworth, James. Letter, 14 January Letter, 14 January [], from James Bozworth [Bosworth] , Company D, 17th Connecticut Infantry, at Stafford Court House, Virginia, to Frank Sherwood, Bridgeport, Connecticut, complaining about the quality and price of tobacco and whiskey sold to soldiers, criticizing Ambrose Burnside and the officer corps, while wishing George McClellan were back in command of the army. Boswoth is even critical of the officers of the regiment.

Bradley, John A. Petition, 28 March Petition, 28 March , from John A. Bradley b. Reverse contain a note from Dr. John W. Sale ca. Bradshaw, Herbert Clarence. Papers, , of Herbert Clarence Bradshaw of Prince Edward County, Virginia, and Durham, North Carolina, consisting of articles, bulletins, clippings, correspondence, magazines maps, notes, pamphlets, photographs, and other materials used by Bradshaw to write his History of Prince Edward County and History of Hampden-Sydney College, vol. Bragg, Robert Richard. Reminiscences of Confederate service , 9 May Reminiscences, 9 May , of Robert Richard Bragg b.

Bragg, Thomas. Diary, , of Thomas Bragg , United States Senator and Confederate Attorney-General containing detailed observations and opinions of the political events leading up to and during the Civil War. While U. Senator, Bragg comments on the actions and concerns of both Democrats and Republicans with regards to the sectional differences and the problems of seceeding states.

While attorney general, Bragg gives his opininon about the actions of President Davis, the Cabinet and the Confederate Senate.

Harper's Weekly Image Gallery

He continues to comment on the war, its military aspects, and its effect on the civilian population after his retirement to Petersburg, Virginia. Brant, John B. Letter, 21 December Letter, 21 December , from John B. Brant ca. He writes that he misses his mother and hopes to see her after the war. He informs her of where he lives and his family. Brant adds that he has met and talked with his brother Levi Brant. Brent, Martha Buxton Porter.

Photocopies and photostats negative. Porter career in the Confederate States of America Navy, including his work on rebuilding the Merrimack-Virginia Frigate, the capture and evacuation of Richmond, Virginia in , relationships between the Union soldiers and Richmond citizens after the war, and her marriage to Frank Pierce Brent d. Also includes notes and a drawing of the Merrimack by John Porter and a copy of his parole. Brent, R. Rosters of ex-Confederate soldiers and sailors living in Northumberland County, Virginia, Rosters compiled in by R. Brent, Commissioner of the Revenue under provisions of Act of 6 March , of ex-Confederate soldiers and sailors living in Northumberland County, Virginia, containing age in , rank and company during the Civil War, regiment, service, and remarks.

Apparently there are no ex-Confederate sailors listed on these rosters. Bridges, C. Letter, 25 March , from Major General C. Bridges, Peter Speech, 23 October Briscoe family. Papers, bulk: Accession Goodloe ca. Papers also contain letters from Evie Goodloe to William Briscoe during their courtship and their marriage, and correspondence from Elizabeth Goodloe ca. Duerson Goodloe b. Also letters to and from Evie Briscoe from other relatives and friends. Papers also include accounts and account book, , of Frederick A. Broaddus, William F. Diary, , of William F. Broaddus of Fredericksburg and Charlottesville, Virginia, containing entries covering his arrest and incarceration in Old Capitol by the Union army during the Civil War.

His entries contain descriptions of his fellow prisoners including Belle Boyd Broaddus chronicles his efforts to obtain freedom for himself and many of his neighbors. He also details his efforts to minister to wounded soldiers after his release. Also includes entries covering his efforts to minister during the war to his Baptist congregations in Fredericksburg.

His entries also contain news about various battles and events. Brock, Robert Alonzo. Diaries, Topics covered include being stationed in Fredericksburg and in the Shenandoah Valley, weather observations, drills and dress parades, guard duty, skirmishes with the enemy, letters received and sent, movements of other units, and rumors of victories and defeats by the Confederate and Federal armies. Portions of the diaries are illegible.

Mmedical notebook, [? Medical notebook, [? Volume contains notes on lectures given by hospital staff on various diseases and wounds, and their treatment. Correspondence, ca.

The Geopolitics of the American Civil War

Topics include membership to the Virginia Historical Society, dues, subscriptions to the Southern Historical Society Papers, purchases of archival manuscripts and publications for the society, loans of books, and general Virginia historical and genealogical research inquiries. The letters include some Bible records and genealogical notes for the family the correspondents were researching, making these letters a great source for genealogists. Often the correspondents were researching their last name, although included are some requests for other family names.

Therefore a thorough checking of all family names may be required to find genealogical information relating to a specific family name. Miscellaneous files, The Robert Alonzo Brock miscellaneous files, , include a wide variety of business, organizational, personal, and military records collected by Brock. The records encompass not only Virginia, but many other East coast colonies and states. The files are organized chronologically and cover a variety of topics, locations, and time periods. Included are accounts, affidavits, agreements, bills, bonds, correspondence, deeds, inventories, invitations, petitions, power of attorney, promissory notes, receipts, reports, surveys, reports, and warrants.

Topics include agriculture, business, genealogy, politics, social life, universities, and war. The collection encompasses such a wide range of materials, a separate database was created to identify each manuscript. In order to access the collection, patrons should search the database for specific names or topics. Brodnax, William H. Brodnax of Brunswick, Greensville, and Dinwiddie Counties, Virginia, consisting of accounts, addresses, correspondence, military orders, resolutions, and speeches concerning, religion, slaves, timber, the Virginia state militia, politics, legal affairs, and personal matters.

Include letters from Robert G. Withers of Greene County, Alabama concerning his plantation there; and a military order, 25 May , assigning Private T. Brooke, St. George Tucker. Typescript copy of the autobiography, , of St. The autobiography mainly covers events while Brooke was living in Virginia, until Extensive genealogical notes are given for the Brooke, Selden, and Tucker families. He recounts the battles of Gettysburg and the Wilderness.

An appendix at the end of the narrative contains transcripts of letters of commendation for military service and a letter from the Haw family who cared for Brooke when he was wounded at the Battle of the Wilderness. The culmination of the Stones River Campaign, the battle of Stones River had the highest casualty rates on both sides.

Union Major General Philip H. Major General William T. Sherman took on Joseph E. Johnston during the Atlanta campaign. The battle of Nashville was the last major battle in the Western Theater and a major victory for the Union. Subscribe and save! History Videos Galleries.

This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862 This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862
This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862 This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862
This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862 This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862
This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862 This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862
This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862 This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862
This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862 This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862
This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862 This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862

Related This Week in the Civil War - Mar. 16 - 22, 1862



Copyright 2019 - All Right Reserved